Social Interaction Affects the Lifespan of Those With Cancer

social interaction

Researchers at the National Human Genome Research Institute recently studied the effects of social interaction on cancer patients’ survival. They found that patients who interacted with someone who died within five years of chemotherapy were more likely to die within five years themselves. Patients who interacted with someone who survived 5 years or more after chemotherapy were more likely to survive five years or more themselves. The findings show the importance of social support during moments of high stress. The study looked at cancer patients interacting with other cancer patients, but positive social support from friends and family likely also has a great impact on the patient’s stress level, and perhaps their survival. 1

  • 1. Jeffrey Lienert, Christopher Steven Marcum, John Finney, Felix Reed-Tsochas, Laura Koehly. "Social influence on 5-year survival in a longitudinal chemotherapy ward co-presence network." Cambridge Core. 2017 July 12. [CAMBRIDGE]
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